Clarion Ledger: Let the formerly incarcerated work

Mississippi has a recidivism problem that’s jeopardizing public safety and burdening taxpayers. As of 2013, the Magnolia State had the nation’s third-highest incarceration rate per capita. What’s more, research suggests that around 95 percent of Mississippi’s enormous prison population will eventually be freed. 

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Jonathan Haggerty
The Crime Report: Not Guilty—But Not Free

Earlier this year, Richard Phillips—wrongfully convicted and locked up for 47 years— was finally exonerated and released at the age of 72. His reentry into society should be a happy occasion, but Phillips now faces an entirely new set of challenges. When the state makes such a grave mistake, you would assume there would be a protocol to help Phillips transition back into the real world.

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Jonathan Haggerty
R Street Blog: A booming economy should mean a second chance for individuals with a criminal record

There may be no more light-hearted or fitting indicator of the strength of our economy than Walmart’s decision to allow its employees to wear jeans. A decade after the financial crisis and ensuing Great Recession, employees have become such a scarce resource that employers can no longer afford not to think outside the box. There remains, however, one group of potential employees that is consistently overlooked: individuals with a criminal record.

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Jonathan Haggerty